Positions

Our lab is located in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Dartmouth College. As a member of the Ivy League, Dartmouth offers a vibrant intellectual community. Dartmouth is located in the scenic Upper Valley of New Hampshire, close to several Appalachian trails, and is only a 2-hour drive from Boston.

Prospective Graduate Students
We have openings for two graduate student for Fall 2021.

1. Fully-funded PhD Position in Computational and Cognitive Neuroscience

The Computational and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab (CCNL) at Dartmouth has a fully-funded PhD position for a motivated student to work on an exciting project on the role of attention in reward-based learning. The project involves a combination of human experiments and computational modeling.

Experimentally, it aims to extend our previous studies that examined learning with multiple cues (Soltani et al, 2016) and multi-dimensional cues (Farashahi et al, 2017; Farashahi et al, 2020). In terms of computational modeling, the aim is to extend current mechanistic models (c.f., Soltani et al, 2016 and Farashahi et al, 2017) as well as recurrent neural networks to better understand the role of attention in learning from high-dimensional stimuli and how complex learning strategies emerge over time.

A suitable candidate would have a strong background in cognitive and/or computational neuroscience, good computer programming skills, and a strong desire to understand neural mechanisms underlying cognition.
Interested candidates should contact Alireza Soltani (Alireza.Soltani@dartmouth.edu).

To apply, please visit the Dartmouth PBS’s Graduate Admissions page
For more recent publications from the lab please visit http://ccnl.dartmouth.edu

Relevant references:
Soltani A, Khorsand P, Guo CZ, Farashahi S, Liu J (2016). Neural Substrates of Cognitive Biases during Probabilistic Inference. Nature Communications, 7:11393
Farashahi S, Rowe K, Aslami Z, Lee D, Soltani A (2017). Feature-based Learning Improves Adaptability without Compromising Precision. Nature Communications, 8:1768.
Farashahi S, Xu J, Wu S-W, Soltani A (2020). Learning Arbitrary Stimulus-Reward Associations for Naturalistic Stimuli Involves Transition from Learning about Features to Learning about Objects. Cognition, 205.

2. Fully-funded PhD Position in Cognitive Neuroscience

The Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Lab and the Computational and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab at Dartmouth have a joint, fully-funded PhD position for a motivated student to work on an exciting project on understanding how interactions between belief, expectation, and prior experience shape learning about reward and pain, process of belief formation, and how expectation or reward and pain influences perception and learning.

The project is a collaboration between two labs and involves a combination of human experiments and computational modeling.

A suitable candidate would have a strong background in cognitive and/or computational neuroscience, good computer programming skills, and a strong desire to understand neural mechanisms underlying cognition.

Interested candidates should contact Alireza Soltani (Alireza.Soltani@dartmouth.edu) and/or Tor Wager (Tor.D.Wager@dartmouth.edu). To apply, please visit the PBS’s Graduate Admissions page

Relevant references:
Soltani, Khorsand, Guo, Farashahi, Liu (2016). Neural Substrates of Cognitive Biases during Probabilistic Inference. Nature Communications, 7:11393
Jepma, Koban, van Doorn, Jones, Wager (2018). Behavioural and neural evidence for self-reinforcing expectancy effects on pain. Nature human behaviour, 2(11):838-55.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities
In our research we use both computational (detailed models of the brain) and experimental (human psychophysics and neuroimaging) approaches. Undergraduate students with quantitative and programming skills can be involved in computational modeling projects and those with interests in learning about experimental methods can contribute to designing/conducting experiments and to analyzing data.

NIDA Summer Research Internship Program (Application Deadline: February 10, 2020)Substance abuse and addiction research internship opportunity.

The NIDA Summer Research Internship Program introduces undergraduate students, with a goal of increasing underrepresented groups in biomedical and behavioral sciences, to substance abuse and addiction research. Through this program, undergraduate students age 18 years and older, conduct substance abuse and addiction research by participating in internships with NIDA funded scientists at universities across the United States.  Paid, 8-week, hands-on research experiences may include a variety of different activities and research projects. To apply and view program information, see the NIDA Summer Research Internship Program online application.
Feel free to contact Ms. Julie Huffman regarding questions (Julie.Huffman@nih.gov).